Section #: 30.2 Measuring the Stars

Practice Test
  1.Which spectrum is used to identify the composition of a star?

  a.   A  
  b.   B  
  c.   C  
  d.   all of the above  
  2.What is the disadvantage of absolute magnitude?  
  a.   It is only the apparent magnitude.  
  b.   It can't be calculated for the Sun.  
  c.   It can only be calculated if a stars distance is known.  
  d.   It can only be calculated if the stars composition is known.  
  3.Mass, luminosity, temperature, and diameter of stars can be demonstrated on a __________.  
  a.   Hertzsprung-Russell diagram  
  b.   spectra  
  c.   main sequence  
  d.   Doppler shift  
  4.From Earth, stars appear to shift in position, which is called __________.  
  a.   circumpolar  
  b.   apparent magnitude  
  c.   parallax  
  d.   binary  
  5.The difference of two stars' spectra is due to the difference of their __________.  
  a.   luminosity  
  b.   composition  
  c.   temperature  
  d.   apparent magnitude  
  6.Why doesn't apparent magnitude actually measure the brightness of the star?  
  a.   It doesn't account for energy output.  
  b.   It doesn't account for composition.  
  c.   It doesn't account for distance.  
  d.   It doesn't account for temperature.  
  7.Energy output from the surface of a star is called __________.  
  a.   apparent magnitude  
  b.   spectra  
  c.   luminosity  
  d.   absolute magnitude  
  8.According to the H-R diagram, which are the most common stars.

  a.   giants  
  b.   supergiants  
  c.   main sequence  
  d.   white dwarfs  
  9.A __________ is visible light arranged according to wavelength.  
  a.   spectrum  
  b.   auroras  
  c.   solar flare  
  d.   emission spectrum  
  10.Groups of stars named after mythological characters, animals, or everyday objects are called __________.  
  a.   main sequence stars  
  b.   binary stars  
  c.   constellations  
  d.   coronal holes  
  11.The figures of constellations show ________.

  a.   circumpolar constellations  
  b.   constellations seen all year round  
  c.   constellations only seen in specific seasons  
  d.   all of the above  
  12.According to the H-R diagram, what is the apparent magnitude of our sun?

  a.   0  
  b.   +1  
  c.   +5  
  d.   +10  
  13.Constellations that can be seen all year long from a certain location are __________.  
  a.   binary  
  b.   seasonal  
  c.   circumpolar  
  d.   cluster  
  14.What causes the wavelength of a star's spectral lines to shift?  
  a.   the temperature of the star  
  b.   the composition of the star  
  c.   the apparent magnitude of the star  
  d.   motion between the star and the observer  
  15.What are two stars that orbit a common center of mass called?  
  a.   a binary  
  b.   seasonal  
  c.   circumpolar  
  d.   a cluster  

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