Mathematics: Applications & Concepts, Course 2
Mathematics: Applications & Concepts, Course 2 Glencoe Online
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Group Activity Cards

Statistics
and Probability


Use groups of 2.
Materials: Compass, protractor
The Not-So-Great Indoors

Read the following.

You know that air pollution is a problem in many areas. Did you also know that air pollution can be a problem inside buildings? In fact, the air we breathe indoors may be even worse than the air we breathe outdoors. Some sources of indoor pollution are radon (a natural, odorless gas that seeps though the foundations of houses), asbestos, carpeting, mothballs, shoe polish, plywood, paint, tobacco smoke, and cleaning products.

Ask at least fifteen people to name a source of indoor air pollution. In a frequency table record the number of people who could name one source of indoor air pollution, more than one source of indoor air pollution, or no sources of indoor air pollution.

Write a short report about indoor air pollution. Include a circle graph to show whether or not most people know about the quality of indoor air.

 

 
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Mathematics: Applications & Concepts, Course 2