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Chapter 29: The Physical Geography of Southeast Asia
"Indonesia"

Introduction
In this chapter students learned about the physical geography of Southeast Asia, including the climates and vegetation of the region. In this activity students will focus on the island nation of Indonesia and its many interesting destinations for travelers.

Lesson Description
Students will access information from the Destination Indonesia Web site to learn about the island nation of Indonesia. Students will answer four questions and then use what they have learned to write two full-page journal entries about one or more travel destinations in Indonesia.

Instructional Objectives

  1. Students will be able to describe the landscape and physical features of the island nation of Indonesia.
  2. Students will be able to apply what they have learned to write journal entries about travel destinations in Indonesia.

Applied Content Standards
Standard 4: The geographically informed person knows and understands the physical and human characteristics of places.
Standard 6: The geographically informed person knows and understands how culture and experience influence people's perceptions of places and regions.
Standard 7: The geographically informed person knows and understands the physical processes that shape the patterns of Earth's surface.
Standard 15: The geographically informed person knows and understands how physical systems affect human systems.

Student Web Activity Answers

  1. The giant Komodo dragon is found on the island of Komodo. Eagles, bush turkeys, water buffalo, and monkey colonies are found on the island of Rinca.
  2. The tri-colored lakes are the most famous attraction. The waters in the three volcanic craters change color from time to time—most recently they were turquoise, olive, and black, but a few years ago they were green-blue, maroon, and black. The cause of the changing colors is thought to be that different minerals are dissolved in each lake.
  3. The thousand islands of Maluku, formerly the Moluccas, were the spice islands. Traders came seeking cloves, nutmeg, and mace.
  4. Irian Jaya shares its landmass with Papua New Guinea and is described as "one of the world's last wilderness areas." It features some of the most rugged terrain on the earth—snowcapped mountains, mangrove swamps, jungle scenery, equatorial glaciers, abundant bird and animal life, and great trekking opportunities.
  5. Journal entries will vary but should indicate that students are familiar with the different islands of Indonesia and the geographic features there.

Go To Student Web Activity

 


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