Glencoe World Geography, 2005
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Chapter 10: Latin America Today
"Brazil"

Introduction
Students have read about the history, culture, social structure, and economy of contemporary Latin America. In this lesson they will learn more about Brazil, South America's largest country. They will learn about the country's shrinking rain forests, vast and diverse wildlife, large cities, and the Amazon—the world's second-longest river.

Lesson Description
Students will visit the Destination Brazil Web site to learn more about Brazil's geography, people, culture, and history. Students will answer four questions and then apply what they have learned to create a multimedia presentation or poster display about the destruction of the Amazon region.

Instructional Objectives

  1. Students will be able to describe the country of Brazil and the lives of some of the people that live there.
  2. Students will be able to apply what they have learned to create a multimedia presentation or poster display about the destruction of the Amazon region.

Applied Content Standards
Standard 4: The geographically informed person knows and understands the physical and human characteristics of places.
Standard 10: The geographically informed person knows and understands the characteristics, distribution, and complexity of Earth's cultural mosaics.

Student Web Activity Answers

  1. The Amazon region, home to an estimated 15,000 species of wildlife, is rapidly being settled, logged, and depleted. Many species are under threat because of continued desertification in the northeast, depletion of rain forests, poaching in the Pantanal region, and coastal pollution.
  2. Brasília's location was picked as a way to stimulate the development of the interior of the country. The city was designed for automobiles and air conditioners, and distances between locations are enormous. These distances and the lack of trees to provide protection from the fierce sun make walking as a means of transportation problematic. Civil servants are enticed to live in Brasília with 100 percent salary hikes and big apartments, but those who can afford it leave the city on the weekends for anywhere considered less sterile.
  3. One-third of Rio's citizens live in favelas (shantytowns) with no schools, no doctors, no employment, and high rates of drug abuse and violence. The poor also suffer brutality at the hands of corrupt police.
  4. The rate of inflation has dropped significantly in Brazil, but this has been offset by an increase in unemployment.
  5. Students' presentations or poster displays will vary.

Go To Student Web Activity

 


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Glencoe World Geography, 2005
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