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Georgia’s Geography


Georgia’s Geography

Georgia is a geographically diverse state, a fact seen while traveling from the mountains of the north to the coastal areas of the southeast. Mountains as tall as Brasstown Bald, reaching to 4,784 feet (1,458 meters), compete with Georgia’s long coastline as desirable destinations to visit. Many rivers and much fertile soil contribute to the agricultural health of the state. Farms are spread out across the coastal, Piedmont, and Appalachian regions. Georgia receives an amount of rain that is above the national average. Daily life in Georgia is affected by its geographical features, both natural and manufactured developments.

Georgia has a population of nearly 8.7 million, mostly centered around its cities. Atlanta, the capital, is the center of political activity in Georgia. Outside of Atlanta, the population is spread across countless small towns and several large cities, such as Macon, Columbus, and Savannah.

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Georgia Map

[Art Spec: map of Georgia containing the same info as on map attached (seen at http://www.tripinfo.com/maps/GA.htm ), including roads, interstates, cities, towns.]

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Georgia Counties

Georgia is divided into 159 counties. Georgia's largest county is Fulton County, home to 816,006 residents. Taliaferro County, home to 2,077 residents, is Georgia's smallest. When Georgia's first constitution was approved in 1777, there were only eight counties. The last county to be formed was Peach County in 1924. Today county governments are very active and provide many services to their citizens. About half of Georgia's counties maintain websites where you can learn about their communities.

For a complete list of the 159 counties of Georgia, go to the website www.cviog.uga.edu/Projects/gainfo/co_profi.htm

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Georgia’s Natural Resources

Georgia is rich with many natural resources. The state ranks first in the number of acres of commercial forest. Georgia sells large amounts of lumber, plywood, and paper. Georgia also ranks high as a producer of building stone and crushed stone. Much marble is pulled out of the ground in Pickens County. The Georgia coast provides many resources. The fishing industry produces tons of shrimp and crab every year. Seaports such as Savannah provide a place to load ships for shipment overseas, fueling the state’s economy. The Savannah River is one of several waterways that serves as a mode of transportation for millions of tons of goods every year.

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