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Using Pronouns Correctly

When you write a personal narrative, a short story, or any other form of narrative writing, you will need to use pronouns frequently. To help you use them correctly—and learn how to revise them when you don't—review the rules discussed in this lesson.

In a sentence, a pronoun may be used as either a subject or an object. In general, use subject pronouns before the verb in a sentence; use object pronouns after a verb or a preposition. Keep in mind that subject and object pronouns sometimes have different forms, as shown in the table below.

Subject
Object
I
me
you
you
he, she, it
him, her, it
we
us
you
you
they
them

Use a subject pronoun after a linking verb, however: The writer of the report on seatbelt safety was she. Also remember to use subject pronouns in compound subjects and object pronouns in compound objects. Study the following examples:

Compound
Subject
He and Margo will enter the health and science fair.
Compound
Subject
Jackie and I plan to chart the constellations.
Compound
Object
Would you tell her and James what time it will begin?
Compound
Object
Astronomy interests him and me.
Compound
Object
Peter will demonstrate a volcano with Meena and her.

Notice that when I is a part of the compound subject, it comes after the other parts of the subject. Likewise, when me is part of the compound object, it comes after the other parts of the object.